Azure Category

All of my Blog posts and Articles in the Azure Category


Azure Functions Event Based Architecture

As I mentioned in my previous post on Azure Function basics, Functions are self contained code that are initiated with a trigger. This makes Functions extremely useful when working with Event driven architectures where your application is responding to discrete events. This week I spent a bit of time away from playing with the technology I’m using to build a Discord Bot and really started to plan out how to build the features.

How to Log and Analyze Azure Functions

When you create an Azure Function in Visual Studio you will have a ILogger injected into your method that provides logging services for you. When you run your Azure Functions locally this logger will display messages in the console, but for deployments you can connect Azure Application Insights to your Function to capture these logs, as well as provide a heap of monitoring information. Let’s check out how this works and what you can do with it.

Local Development of Azure Functions

One of the first things you want to do when you start out developing an Azure Function is to run it and potentially debug issues. You want to see what is going on with your Function before deployment to make sure it is working as intended. Let’s take a look at how to set up Visual Studio (2019 Community Edition) to run Functions locally, see what is going on and debug them.

Azure Function Basics

The Basics of Azure Functions I started getting back into writing a Discord Bot using a Micro-services architecture. I’m using Azure Functions to do a lot of the heavy lifting when it comes to writing my bot and I thought it might be useful to do a deep dive into why I chose them. In this post I’m going to go through what Azure Functions are, when to use them and some application structures that best leverage this technology.

Discord Bot Part 3 - Using Azure Table Storage

In my previous post we modified our Discord bot to take messages generated in chat, put them on a queue and processed them using an Azure Function. In this post we are going to modify the function that reads the message to place the message in an additional storage queue. An additional Azure Function will monitor this queue and write the message to table storage. Thankfully we have our core worker in place, this post, and future posts, should be a little bit shorter as we are now making incremental changes and improvements.

Discord Bot Part 2 - Using Azure Storage Queues and Service Bus

In my previous post we created a basic Discord bot that could listen to events from a Discord server. Up next we are going to start taking those events and moving them into a Storage Queue so they can be processed by an Azure Function. We are also going to get the bot to listen to a Service Bus Queue so it can pick up a message and deliver it back to the Discord Server.

Discord Bot Part 1 - Designing the Bot and creating the event proxy

Building services using a microservices architecture offers a number of benefits, especially when combined with the serverless options cloud providers can offer. This combination allows you to build a variety of small services, that cost very little, but can scale up with minimal to no additional effort and handle burst scaling really well. Over the next few posts I am going to go through designing and building a microservices application using a variety of services within Azure.

Creating a Contact Form API with Azure Functions

I’ve been looking into Azure Functions for the last few months, playing around with various experiments when I have had time. For those who haven’t heard of them, Azure Functions are a service that lets you build event based micro services without the need to manage any infrastructure. For someone who runs a static website without a WebApp server or virtual machine, this can add a lot of additional functionality that you would normally need dedicated infrastructure to provide.

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