Articles

All of my Articles arranged by published date


Discord Bot Part 3 - Using Azure Table Storage

In my previous post we modified our Discord bot to take messages generated in chat, put them on a queue and processed them using an Azure Function. In this post we are going to modify the function that reads the message to place the message in an additional storage queue. An additional Azure Function will monitor this queue and write the message to table storage. Thankfully we have our core worker in place, this post, and future posts, should be a little bit shorter as we are now making incremental changes and improvements.

Discord Bot Part 2 - Using Azure Storage Queues and Service Bus

In my previous post we created a basic Discord bot that could listen to events from a Discord server. Up next we are going to start taking those events and moving them into a Storage Queue so they can be processed by an Azure Function. We are also going to get the bot to listen to a Service Bus Queue so it can pick up a message and deliver it back to the Discord Server.

Discord Bot Part 1 - Designing the Bot and creating the event proxy

Building services using a microservices architecture offers a number of benefits, especially when combined with the serverless options cloud providers can offer. This combination allows you to build a variety of small services, that cost very little, but can scale up with minimal to no additional effort and handle burst scaling really well. Over the next few posts I am going to go through designing and building a microservices application using a variety of services within Azure.

Creating a Contact Form API with Azure Functions

I’ve been looking into Azure Functions for the last few months, playing around with various experiments when I have had time. For those who haven’t heard of them, Azure Functions are a service that lets you build event based micro services without the need to manage any infrastructure. For someone who runs a static website without a WebApp server or virtual machine, this can add a lot of additional functionality that you would normally need dedicated infrastructure to provide.

Creating a Version Flow in SharePoint

This post has been updated to reflect some issues with using the versions endpoint Well, it’s been a long time between drinks as far as blog posts go as I have been super busy with work and university, so here is something interesting I had to do up to prove some document and records management principles I believe in. Photo by Ricardo Gomez Angel on Unsplash

Static Websites using Azure Storage and CDN

As you may or may not know, I run my site on an Azure Web Service using Hugo and a Visual Studio build pipeline (Full Details Here). I have been reasonably happy with this service, however late last year Microsoft made hosting static websites on Azure Storage generally available. There are a number of benefits in hosting your static website on Azure storage, the primary factor being cost. Photo by TheAndrasBarta on Pixabay

Running a Hugo Site on Microsoft Azure

The Hugo Logo copyright © Steve Francia 2013 − 2018 I like Hugo, as I have mentioned before, and I prefer to host my site within Microsoft Azure for a number of reasons, including control and the fact I play with resources within Azure, so I thought it would be good to share how I constructed my build pipeline to make working with Hugo to build and publish content in Azure a bit more automated.

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